• Who do I call for information about one of your homes?
    • 1-800-880-6571
  • How can I get somebody placed into one of your homes?
    • Visit our Residential Placement page for information on getting somebody placed into one of our homes
  • What is the difference between an eight-bed CILA and a sixteen-bed ICF/DD?
    • Other than the size of the home, the main difference between a CILA (Community Integrated Living Arrangement) and an ICF/DD (Intermediate Care Facility for persons with Developmental Disabilities) is the funding stream. CILAs are funded by Medicaid Waiver grants and ICFs/DD are funded by Medicaid. CILA homes have fewer regulatory guidelines to meet than do ICF homes.
  • Who can live in a CILA?
    • Individuals who have a developmental disability as their primary diagnosis can live in a CILA, provided they have the Medicaid Waiver funding to support them, or they are private pay.
  • Who can live in an ICF/DD home?
    • Individuals who have a developmental disability as their primary diagnosis can live in an ICF/DD home provided they are eligible for Medicaid funding, or private pay.
  • How much does it cost to live in a CILA or an ICF/DD home? Will I or my ward have personal spending money?
    • People who live in CILAs receive funding from a Medicaid Waiver program, and that funding, combined with the person’s Social Security or other entitlement monies, pays for the person’s stay. Individuals living in CILA homes keep $50.00 a month from their Social Security monies to be used for personal spending.
      People who live in ICFs/DD receive funding from Medicaid, and that funding, combined with their Social Security or other entitlement monies, pays for that person’s stay. Individuals living in an ICF/DD home keep $30.00 each month from their Social Security monies to be used for personal spending.
  • How can my family member/ward receive CILA funding?
    • CILA funding availability is determined for the person by the Pre-Admission Screening (PAS) agency. The PAS agent will meet the individual, talk with people close to him/her, will collect information about the individual (for example, medical information, psychological information, health information, etc.), and will then make the funding determination based upon standards set up by the Illinois Department of Human Services.
  • Who works in the homes, and how are they trained?
    • Adults, aged eighteen years and older, who have successfully passed a background check, may work at the homes. Within 120 days of hire, each staff person must successfully complete a 120-hour training curriculum which includes 40 hours of classroom training and 80 hours of on-the-job training. Also, each staff person is certified for First Aid and CPR, and receives special training to ensure the health and safety of each person living in the homes.


 

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